🖼 Maundy Thursday 🖼 Open Thread

by

Good Morning my friends,

Today is Thursday and in Holy Week it is also known as Maundy Thursday. It isn’t much mentioned anymore as are a lot of the things that were familiar to me when I was growing up.

What is Maundy Thursday 2017? Why do Christians celebrate this day?

As important as the days of the Holy Week appear to be, they’re really not. There’s nothing special that happens on these days. The heavens don’t open up. Portals to hell don’t swallow Christ again. The days of Holy Week really aren’t the point. The main focus is the message that the the days have that point to the true focus of the Holy Week which is Jesus Christ.

One of the days of the Holy Week is Maundy Thursday. What is Maundy Thursday and what message does it give to us Christians?

The objective of Maundy Thursday is to recall and reflect upon two important events in Jesus’ earthly ministry- the last Supper with which He had with the disciples and the time Jesus washed the disciples’ feet.

Both occurrences were recorded in the Bible to have happened the night Jesus was betrayed and captured by officials. These two accounts are important ones because of the messages they give us until today.

While few remember that it is Maundy Thursday today almost all will remember the image of what it celebrates.
Related image
Leonardo Da Vinci’s painting of the last supper is one of the most famous in the world.In case you care about the seating arrangments, which we memorized back in my day, here’s how they were seated:https://i2.wp.com/431445771369120605.weebly.com/uploads/4/7/9/1/47911243/7246454_orig.jpg

The thought of the great Leonardo’s great work of art got me to thinking about how much of great art is of religious images.

The images of the Sistine Chapel are of course some of the most famous and most beautiful. These were painted by the incomparable Michelangelo.

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, and poet of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art.
Born: March 6, 1475, Caprese Michelangelo, Italy
Died: February 18, 1564, Rome, Italy
Full name: Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni

Image result for sistine chapel

Speaking only for myself I find them in totality, overwhelming. I need to see them individually to appreciate what they are and what they say.

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Even as a child the part of the fresdco with the Creation of Adam spoke to me in some way I cannot explain. For many of my contemporaries the nudity was the big deal. Not for me. Not that I’m claiming that I didn’t have a dirty little mind just like all kids – just not in this case. Perhaps it was the sheer size and scope of the art that made me look at more than nudity.

Back to the art.

The Adoration of the Magi

The Adoration of the Magi   artist: Hieronymus Bosch (Netherlandish, ’s Hertogenbosch ca. 1450–1516 ’s Hertogenbosch)

I am not the first, although I once thought I was, to see how the artists of the middle-ages clothed the religious images as they themselves were clothed. It was very confusing for me as a child.  Now I just enjoy the art.

Image result for great religious art images

Christ Surrounded by Musician Angels – Hans Memling (also spelled Memlinc; c. 1430 – 11 August 1494) was a German painter who moved to Flanders and worked in the tradition of Early Netherlandish painting.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/48/f5/18/48f518186a5aad27901d2b15261745c6.jpg

The Adoration of the Magi – artist: Diego Velázquez, in full Diego Rodríguez de Silva Velázquez (baptized June 6, 1599, Sevilla, Spain—died Aug. 6, 1660, Madrid), the most important Spanish painter of the 17th century, a giant of Western art.

https://i0.wp.com/www.italian-renaissance-art.com/images/xRaphael-Madonna-Child-sisti.jpg.pagespeed.ic.wRJnAa3IAV.jpg

The Sistine Madonna, also called the Madonna di San Sisto, is an oil painting by the Italian artist Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (1483 – 1520). The altarpiece was commissioned in 1512 by Pope Julius II for the church of San Sisto, Piacenza. The canvas was one of the last Madonnas painted by the artist. Giorgio Vasari called it “a truly rare and extraordinary work”.

Relocated to Dresden from 1754, the well-known painting was particularly influential in Germany. After World War II, it was relocated to Moscow for a decade before being returned to Germany. It is now a master piece of the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister.

https://static.independent.co.uk/s3fs-public/styles/article_small/public/thumbnails/image/2016/08/21/13/crucifixion.jpg

Crucifixion’ by Albrecht Altdorfer (c. 1480 – February 12, 1538) was a German painter, engraver and architect of the Renaissance working in Regensburg.

https://classconnection.s3.amazonaws.com/311/flashcards/4276311/jpg/lamentation_over_the_dead_christ__1490-92-1425CDC0E13041A854A.jpg

The Lamentation over the Dead Christ with Saints is a painting of the Lamentation of Christ by the Italian Renaissance artist Sandro Botticelli, dated between 1490-1495. The painting was originally kept in Santa Maria Maggiore, Florence. It is currently housed in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli of Milan. The painting is one of two versions of The Lamentation by Botticelli. The Lamentation over Dead Christ, circa 1492, is currently housed in the Alte Pinakothek in Munich.

Image result for the denial of peter rembrandt images

The Denial of Peter is a 1660 painting by Rembrandt, now in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (/ˈrɛmbrænt, brɑːnt/; Dutch: [ˈrɛmbrɑnt ˈɦɑrmə(n)soːn vɑn ˈrɛin 15 July 1606 – 4 October 1669) was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker. A prolific and versatile master across three media, he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/4a/f9/df/4af9dfb33d0af93a2b655b87aac1860f.jpg

Christ Carrying the Cross by Sebastiano del Piombo (Italian: [sebaˈstjaːno del ˈpjombo]; c. 1485 – 21 June 1547) was an Italian painter of the High Renaissance and early Mannerist periods famous as the only major artist of the period to combine the colouring of the Venetian school in which he was trained with the monumental forms of the Roman school. He belongs both to the painting school of his native city, Venice, where he made significant contributions before he left for Rome in 1511, and that of Rome, where he stayed for the rest of his life, and whose style he thoroughly adopted.

There are too many great religious works of art to ever cover them in a day, a week or a month. So I will end as I started, with the magnificent Leonardo Da Vinci and The Madonna of the Carnation.

Madonna of the Carnation - by Leonardo Da Vinci

Happy Maundy Thursday my friends.
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18 Responses to “🖼 Maundy Thursday 🖼 Open Thread”

  1. kenoshamarge Says:

    The land of the free … unless you live in a nursing home

    The very purpose of nursing homes themselves is to house people who would otherwise be inconvenient to their relatives or to society at large. Children who do not want to have to take care of their elderly parents outsource the job to professionals, where sedatives can be a substitute for compassion.

    The pretense of “medical care” is used to give legitimacy to what would otherwise be a crime. When a man administers a sedative to a woman he meets in a bar without her consent, it is regarded as assault. It is no less reprehensible for nursing home workers to drug their charges without consent in order to make their jobs a little easier.
    The elderly do not cease to be human. Their rights are not forfeited when they reach a certain age. That they should be so misused against their wills is a damning indictment of a system that ought not be possible in “the land of the free.”

    https://www.conservativereview.com/commentary/2017/04/land-of-the-free-unless-you-live-in-a-nursing-home#sthash.zT6iLdkc.dpuf

    I wish I thought that people would care about this issue. I don’t. A society that allows unborn babies to be flushed like detrius, that tsk tsks year in and year out about the vile treatment accorded our Veterans at the Va and that doesn’t care if their children receive a decent education or not won’t care if Grandma is drugged and mistreated in a nursing home.

  2. kenoshamarge Says:

    Spicer: ‘I’ve Let the President Down’ on Hitler Remarks

    “There’s no other way to say it. I got into a topic that I shouldn’t have and I screwed up. I mean, you know, and I hope people understand that we all make mistakes,” he said. “…I hope each person can understand that part of existing is understanding that when you do something wrong, if own up to it, you do it.”

    Spicer noted “it’s a very holy week for both the Jewish people and the Christian people and this is not to — to make a gaffe and a mistake like this is inexcusable and reprehensible… this compounds that kind of mistake.”

    Spicer explained Trump’s rationale for not attending this year’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner.

    “This is not the appropriate year to go,” he said. “I don’t think he should fake it. I think going to a dinner and you sit around and pretend that everything is hunky-dory is probably not an appropriate year to be doing this.”

    Spicer kept the door open to Trump attending the dinner next year.

    “We have a right and the same First Amendment gives us a right to say this isn’t appropriate to go and it sends the wrong signal, and if things get better maybe we’ll attend next year – but this is not the year to do it,” he said.

    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/2017/04/12/spicer-ive-let-the-president-down-on-hitler-remarks/

    I respect Spicer for owning up to his stupid remark. Stupid and ill-informed. What I do not respect is the usual hysteria over a stupid remark. Spicer is pretty much known for saying stupid things or for saying things in a stupid way. I personally think the job is beyond his ability. That said to say because he made a gaffe that he’s a “Holocaust Denier” is sheer claptrap.

  3. kenoshamarge Says:

  4. Cindyindie Says:

    The.art is gorgeous!
    Tonight we’re taking our grandkids to the Maundy Thursday
    service at our church. There will be washing of feet…then the priest will strip the altar in darkness and silence….it’s a very moving service.

    • kenoshamarge Says:

      It is a very moving service and one I find inspirational. So glad you are taking your grand-kids and keeping the tradition alive.

      I hesitated about the Maundy Thursday post because there seem to be few of us left who even know what it means. Health no longer allows me to go – I will miss not being there but have happiness knowing you will be there.

      “The Last Supper” was the very first piece of art that I ever recognized. As my father other said, at least we got off to a great start in art appreciation.

      • Cindyindie Says:

        I’m so sorry your health is so prohibitive. We’ll think of you tonight.
        I usually get so choked up when we sing ” Were You There When They Cruicifed My Lord?” that I can’t finish singing it!

        • kenoshamarge Says:

          That song touches something deep within all Christians I think. I always liked this Johnny Cash version although there are so many good renditions. I guess my favorite would be when I was sitting in a pew with all around me singing it.

          My body is weak but the spirit is still strong. And I thank God every day that I was born in a time when my health doesn’t leave me feeling alone and not part of the world anymore. My computer keeps me in touch with the world and that is wonderful.

          Some of the problems will get better – some will not. But as long as God leaves me here I’ll be grateful for all that I still have.

        • Rabble Rouser Reverend Amy Says:

          Thank you, Marge – I can totally appreciate how hard it is when health prohibits us from doing things we want to do. I very much appreciate you writing this post abt Maundy Thursday.

          And Cindy, so nice to *see* you. So glad you and the grandkids get to go to church tonight. I know just what you mean abt some of these hymns that are impossible to get through…

  5. kenoshamarge Says:

  6. Rabble Rouser Reverend Amy Says:

    Wonderful post, Marge. And a good Maundy Thursday to you, as well.

    May Good Friday be a day of prayer and reflection for the great gift and sacrifice made on that day. And may it serve as preparation for the miracle and joy of the Resurrection to come…

    • Cindyindie Says:

      Beautifully said, Cuzin!

    • kenoshamarge Says:

      I understand we must have the horror of the Crucifixion to make us truly appreciate the gift God gave us – the life of his son for all our sins. And then the great joy of the resurrection.

      I thank God for the gift of each new day and look forward to another Easter Sunday.

      Quite frankly both my MIL and I doubted, 2 years ago in January, that we would see another Easter. And now here we both are preparing for our 3rd.

      • Cindyindie Says:

        And how happy we all are that you’ re preparing for your third!. Thought about you tonight at church. It was a wonderful service.

        • kenoshamarge Says:

          Thank you Cindi. I am so glad it was a wonderful service. You are creating memories for your grandchildren that will last a lifetime.

          I couldn’t go but I have all the wonderful memories from the past to make me feel the wonder.

          And yes, I find each new day a miracle. It gives me more time to repent of all my sins, and they are many, as well as appreciate each new day.

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